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Top 5 Questions You Wanted to Ask Rhianon Taylor

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Top 5 Questions You Wanted to Ask Rhianon Taylor

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Top 5 Questions You Wanted to Ask Rhianon Taylor

QuiltingHub had the pleasure of interviewing Rhianon Taylor for the top five questions you have always wanted to know about Rhianon. Rhianon is an amazing quilter out of Scotland. She makes some of the most amazing quilted and embroidered items such as quilts, cushion, bags, and wall hangings.

Top 5 Questions You Wanted to Ask Rhianon Taylor

 

How long have you been doing free motion quilting and what kind of machine do you use?

RHIANON: I taught myself free motion quilting 3 years ago when I got involved in making quilts for the victims of the Japanese Tsunami.

These quilts had to be made in a hurry and hand quilting was out of the question. When I started, I had no darning foot so I didn't use one at all ( not recommended) but carried on with a simple stipple and it looked OK. Shortly after, my darning foot arrived and I have never looked back!

The machine I used then was purchased from a supermarket and very basic. Good enough to learn the rudiments on. I then progressed to a slightly more expensive machine but still with a 6" arm space.

I now have a Janome 1600P which is a straight stitch only, semi industrial machine with a 9" arm space.

 

How do you quilt a big quilt on a domestic sewing machine?

RHIANON: Although the machine I am using now has 9" of arm space, I have quilted large quilts on a domestic machine with a 6" arm space. I never roll my quilts as I'm working on them. I make sure it is well supported by a table/ironing board or a chair and push it through as I can. As long as the quilt is well basted (I use safety pins so I can move them around) and that the area being worked on is nice and flat under the foot. I find gloves for grip an absolute essential!

 

How do you get good at quilting feathers?

RHIANON: I think all quilters love feathers and I was no exception. It really is all about practice, practice and more practice. As well as sewing feathers, draw them. I was forever drawing feathers everywhere - just little doodles on any scrap of paper and drawing pads are cheap and easy to come by. If you can draw them - you can quilt them.

 

How do you get your quilted feathers to look so puffy?

RHIANON: I mainly use Hobbs heirloom wadding ( batting) but sometimes for a really puffy look to feather plumes I will use a very thick 6oz wadding. It is about an inch thick but is very lightweight. Nice shaped plumes are emphasized by the background being "flattened" by a dense filler such as a tiny stipple, close together lines or small pebbling. People often think it is trapunto.

 

What threads do you use?

RHIANON:I still have many threads I would like to try but I buy a polycore thread made especially for machine quilting by a company in England. I have tried Aurifil and King Tut's threads and liked them very much. I also like variegated threads and metallics although these can be tricky and frustrating to work with.

 

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Glossary

Domestic
A term sometimes used for unbleached muslin, dating from the nineteenth century when printed fabrics were generally imported and plain fabrics were generally manufactured domestically.
Filler
The layer in the middle of a quilt sandwich between the Top and Backing layers consisting of wool, polyester, blends, silk, or cotton.

Same As: Stuffing, Batting, Filling, Wadding
Foot
Accessories that are available for sewing machines and are especially made for quilting.
Free Motion Quilting
Method of quilting where the feed dogs of a sewing machine are lowered or covered and the quilter controls the movement of the fabric under the needle.
Hand Quilting
A running stitch that is made through all three layers of a quilt to hold them together.
Ironing
Moving a hot iron while it has contact with fabric. Often ironing can stretch and distort fabrics and seams. A better alternative is to press, where you just lay the hot iron down and lift straight up from the fabric.

See Also: Pressing
Machine Quilting
Creating quilting stitches on a quilt using a sewing machine instead of sewing them by hand.
Trapunto
A raised, dimensional surface created by putting additional batting or stuffing into areas to sculpt the surface.
Wadding
The layer in the middle of a quilt sandwich between the Top and Backing layers consisting of wool, polyester, blends, silk, or cotton.

Same As: Stuffing, Batting, Filling, Filler