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Quilting Tool Storage Options

Summary

Quilting Contessa discusses the way we store our tools will help us to not only take good care of them, but also make them easily accessible.

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Quilting Tool Storage Options

The way we store our tools will help us to not only take good care of them, but also make them easily accessible. A place for everything and everything in it’s place. So, let’s explore some tool storage options.

Quilting Tool Storage Options

 

Tool Storage

There are many options for quilting tool storage like sewing boxes, specialty-sewing cabinets that hold tools as well as your machine, and sewing armoires, but some times you need more options. Consider the following:

Sewing_Box

 

Magnetic Bar

You may have seen magnetic bars advertised for kitchen use to organize knives and other tools. These can also be great used in the sewing room for scissors, seam rippers, bodkins, hemostats, and other metal tools.

Magnetic Bar

 

Baskets

Tall baskets can be a pretty alternative to hold your often used tools on your cutting table or beside your machine. They also are quite useful to place under the lid of your machine while it is open to drop your fabric scraps into for later use.

Baskets

 

Rolling Tool Box

These boxes can be found in hardware stores as well as online and many times are used for woodworkers or mechanics. They generally have shallow drawers that are perfect for quilting tools like rulers, templates, thread, scissors, etc. Since they have wheels, they can be rolled under your cutting table when not in use and then pulled out and moved to your workspace while you are stitching. Some people also make a removable top for them out of plywood, batting, and ironing board fabric and use this as an extra large pressing space.

Rolling Tool Box

 

Command Hooks

Where would we be without Command Hooks? They are great for hanging rulers and other tools on your walls, table edges, etc. They also can help you control the flow of cords behind your quilting table so that they don’t accidentally get cut with your rotary cutter.

Command Hooks

 

Plastic Zip-Top Baggies

These great little inventions make keeping our patterns and applique pieces together so much easier. Since they come in sizes from “Snack” to XXL, you can carry tiny applique pieces all the way up to finished quilts in these bags and keep them clean and dry and organized.

Zip Top Bags

 

Suitcase With Wheels

When something small just won’t do, a suitcase with wheels can be very helpful. They are made to keep your clothes clean and dry when travelling, so why not use them for storing large quilting projects and transporting them to retreats, classes, etc.?

Rolling Suitcase

 

Peg Board

Peg Board can be a great organizational tool so that you can see what tools you have and always have them at the ready. Some people even use a marker to draw around their tools so that they will know what is missing if a tool has not been replaced as it should.

PegBoard

 

Silverware Caddy

A silverware caddy can be the perfect holder for tools on your cutting table like short rulers, rotary cutters, pencils, pincushions, scissors, etc. and since almost all of them have handles, they are easy to use to move everything over to your pressing and stitching areas also.

Silverware Caddy

 

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Glossary

Applique
Attaching individual pieces of fabric to a background to form a design.

Same As: Appliqué


See Also: Freezer Paper Applique, Needleturn Applique, Machine Applique, Reverse Applique, Shadow Applique
Batting
The layer in the middle of a quilt sandwich between the Top and Backing layers consisting of wool, polyester, blends, silk, or cotton.

Same As: Stuffing, Filling, Wadding, Filler
Drop
The part of a quilt that hangs down the sides of your mattress.
Ironing
Moving a hot iron while it has contact with fabric. Often ironing can stretch and distort fabrics and seams. A better alternative is to press, where you just lay the hot iron down and lift straight up from the fabric.

See Also: Pressing
Pressing
Picking a hot iron up off your fabric or quilt top and then putting it down in another place to remove the wrinkles. When you press your fabric, you do not slide the hot iron.

See Also: Ironing
Rotary Cutter
A very sharp tool that looks like a pizza wheel which is capable of cutting through multiple layers of fabric.
Author
Quilting Contessa
Quilting Contessa is a collection of various authors around the world that have submitted articles for the QuiltingHub 'How To' quilt wiki.  These are authors that do not write enough to have their own authorship, yet provide valuable content for the site.  If you wish to submit an article, contact us on QuiltingHub.
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